MAIDENCOMBE.NET AUTHOR Jim Campbell

MAIDENCOMBE.NET AUTHOR Jim Campbell
Maidencombe resident since 1960. Local historian and author of the 'Coves of Maidencombe'.
Copyright © 2013 . All Rights Reserved.

COMBE WEATHER

TIDES

CURRENT MOON

KESTREL CALLING

BUZZARD IN MY GARDEN

The bowl of the coombe as seen from Sladnor heights

The bowl of the coombe as seen from Sladnor heights

Maidencombe point

Maidencombe point
as seen above Maidencombe cove.

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

RED FLAG ON MAIDENCOMBE COVE

Homemade red flag
Taking a stroll down to Maidencombe Cove yesterday, I was puzzled to see a homemade red flag positioned beside the final flight of steps before the beach cafe.

Displaced warning sign
Possible reasons could be because the warning sign (photo above) to keep away from the cliffs has somehow become displaced or there is a section of railing missing from below the cafe (photo below),
Missing guard rail


Wednesday, November 11, 2015

IMPRESSION OF MAIDENCOMBE'S TIN CHURCH

After further research on one of Maidencombe's enduring mysteries, I believe I have come up with a fair impression of what the 'fabled' Tin Church would have looked like - including its setting nestled between trees - back in c1904.The window of its existence was limited, perhaps from about 1890 until 1920.
Remarkably, a handful of these prefabricated ecclesiastical structures still survive today and are usually afforded listed status, such is their undoubted rarity.

Impression of Maidencombe's Tin Church in Sladnor as viewed from the south.
Situated east of Sladnor Park Road, the only existing evidence of the building is part of the stone entrance, though vestiges of the footprint can be made out below the path that led down to the church.  The building would have been of timber frame construction clad in CGI (corrugated galvanised iron) sheets. After assembly, the churches were painted, often in green or blue.

It is documented that a Parson Bird made the journey from Torquay every Sunday to hold the afternoon service which usually commenced about 2pm. At that time, before the advent of the motor car, he would have been either on horseback or in a pony and trap.

The religious denomination is not known for certain but amid the mid nineteenth century Noncomformist boom and demand for more churches, the probability is that the Maidencombe example supported that trend. 

In the impression (above) Sladnor Park Road would have been to the left of picture behind the screen of trees which, as today, were present a century ago.

MAIDENCOMBE SWIM SUCCESS

Neal Taylor from Brim Hill, Maidencombe, added to his list of achievements when he and his team claimed  two silver medals at the ASA National Masters  Age Group Champonships at Ponds Forge International Sports Centre, Sheffield. Neal is coached by Don Roberts BEM of Ashley Priors Lane.
Neal Taylor (right) at Ponds Forge ISC in 2012
There were over 1000 competitors participating at the three day event held between October 23 and 25.  Neal swam for Totnes in the 4 X 50 metres freestyle and the 4 X 100 metres freestyle relays, finishing runners up to Aberdeen Dolphins in both events.

Neal was first swimmer to go in the longer event and his opening leg can be viewed in the following video clip. He is in lane seven.

video

Friday, November 06, 2015

MAIDENCOMBER HONOURED BY THE QUEEN

Longstanding Maidencombe resident, Don Roberts of Ashley Priors Lane, has been awarded the British Empire Medal in the Queen's Birthday Honours List for services to young people and bell-ringing.  I have only just been made aware of this notable news item which I can now see was reported in the Herald Express last June - but without the Maidencombe connection.

A most respected member of the community, Don Roberts was my swimming master at Torquay Boys Grammar School and continues to coach and advise swimmers in Torbay including Maidencombe swimming star Neal Taylor from Brim Hill.

Don Roberts (centre left) Torquay Boys Grammar School photo 1968
A short quote from one of his pupils brings back memories of 'Mr Roberts' (all teachers at the grammar had nicknames - most of them uncomplimentary, but no-one could find fault or criticism with Don Roberts and he was affectionately known as plain 'Don Roberts' by pupils):

'Don Roberts, swimmer and chemist (in that order), an out-and-out Torquinian from Ellacombe and possessor of a booming singing voice: "And did those feet in Ancient Times?" (was that Concorde? No, it was Don)'.


Maidencomber Don Roberts honoured by the Queen
Article reproduced from http://devonswimming.org.uk/index.htm
A FORMER Torquay Grammar School boy has been awarded a British Empire Medal in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List for services to young people and bellringing.
Donald Roberts, 84, has been recognised for his ‘extraordinary commitment to swimming’ over four decades, according to his citation.
Mr Roberts started out as a newly qualified science teacher at the grammar school in 1953 and has remained an ever present at the school.
He took an active part in fundraising for the building of the Plainmoor Pool during the 1970s, which has remained an important part of the Torquay community.
He has carried on his involvement in the pool, and was instrumental in its recent refurbishment and survival when it was threatened with closure.
He carried this drive into Torquay Boys’ Grammar School, and has been leading swim and water polo teams throughout his time.
For the past 40 years, he has led at least one team, often two or three, to the national finals. In 2006, he was recognised as swimming coach of the year by Torbay Council.
During his 60 years, he has performed at over 1,000 bell towers, 380 in Devon. He has trained over 100 new ringers throughout the last 60 years, and in particular has shown great dedication to two churches, Babbacombe Church and St Marychurch.

BURNING OF THE BAMBOO MAN JUNE 5 2016

SLADNOR PARK CHALETS

SLADNOR PARK CHALETS
Eerily shrouded in mist, two of the lower chalets of Sladnor Park.

AN ODE TO SLADNOR PARK

(sung to the tune of 'Home on the Range')

Oh give me a park where the badgers can roam
Where the deer and the wildlife reside
There never is heard the developer's word
To disturb where the denizens abide

Oh give me a park where the diggers are banned
And the architect can't earn his fee
Where the noise of the town
Is a far distant sound
And conservation is all it can be

For when houses are built
The council covered in guilt
And all the animals forlorn
Now the only sounds to be heard
Are vehicles absurd
And the cries of a motherless fawn

Jim Campbell

BLOG CONTENT

BLOG CONTENT
The twinning of Maidencombe with Comeinbemad reflects the light-hearted nature of this gentle blog. The articles posted are written by the author alone and have no connection with any official body or association.

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OUR MAIN LINK - CLICK ON IMAGE TO REDIRECT

OUR MAIN LINK - CLICK ON IMAGE TO REDIRECT
THE ENDANGERED CIRL BUNTING - SYMBOL OF THE MAIDENCOMBE COMMUNITY GROUP

PUTTING MAIDENCOMBE ON THE MAP

PUTTING MAIDENCOMBE ON THE MAP

OUR LOCAL LINK

I came across this fascinating and informative guide to St Marychurch and Babbacombe recently. For many Maidencombers, these are our local shops and first 'port of call' before venturing into the urban jungles of Torquay. There's a local news feed which is regularly updated. Well worth a look. Here's the link:



CLICK HERE FOR BABBACOMBE & ST MARYCHURCH GUIDE WEBSITE

MOST VIEWED POST ON THIS SITE

MOST VIEWED POST ON THIS SITE
The old Toll House on the west side of the A379 Teignmouth Road, stands at the junction of Claddon Lane with the A379 about 50 yards from Ridge Road and the former position of the black and white Solomons Post sign (see side panel right). This early photo shows the open porch (lower left) - now blocked off and the blanked out toll-board recess (top right). Under the angled roof on the right, there is a small shop and working post office. The building probably dates from 1827 when the new road was built. Originally named Solomon's Post Gate when there was a gate across the road for the toll collector to open upon payment.

RAMBLING GROUP WRITE-UP OF WATCOMBE TO MAIDENCOMBE WALK

Found this interesting little site with a rambling group's write up of walks. CLICK HERE FOR MAIDENCOMBE WALK ARTICLE

MAIDENCOMBER SLADNOR VIDEO AND WRITE-UP

YOUR LOCAL WEB APPROVES DREAMINCOMBES

YOUR LOCAL WEB APPROVES DREAMINCOMBES
After scrutiny by a panel, this site has been added as a reputable source of information about Maidencombe.

ARCHIVE: MAIDENCOMBE TIMELINE EVENING AT THE THATCHED TAVERN

The first Timeline evening took place Wednesday evening March 20th at the Thatched Tavern. Local lad Ziggy Austin's brainchild, it was an endeavour to map out the history of Maidencombe on a ten metre paper scroll. The initiative was first mooted and widely supported on Ziggy's Maidencombe Residents Facebook page. Residents and non residents were asked if they could research local history on the area and bring along any material such as postcards or text to place on the scroll.
The first evening was well attended and as can be seen in the photos on the left, a great deal was achieved.
Longest residing villager, Alan Hunt attended to add his considerable knowledge and was supported by his 'young' student Jim Campbell with a mere 53 years of residence under his belt.
The pub opened up the restaurant area for the occasion and were most generous in providing sandwiches for the studious throng.


SOLOMONS POST AT THE JUNCTION OF TEIGNMOUTH ROAD & RIDGE ROAD

SOLOMONS POST AT THE JUNCTION OF TEIGNMOUTH ROAD & RIDGE ROAD
No known images of this iconic Maidencombe landmark. Post war and up to the late 1960's, sign posts were wooden posts painted black and white. This is a close reconstruction of the sign where buses would actually pull in to for passengers to alight or board.

A UNIQUE VIDEO

A video of one of my foxes being treated for Sarcoptic mange - taking the medication on the food by hand. She recovered completely and my thanks go out to the Derbyshire Fox Rescue who supplied the medication.

DRAMATIC EROSION OF THE SOUTHWEST COASTAL FOOTPATH

Worth a look as Maidencombe's section of the SWCP is also very much under threat.

From myfoxesandbadgers site

ARCHIVE: DANGEROUS STATE OF CLIFF FACE

ARCHIVE: DANGEROUS STATE OF CLIFF FACE
Photo taken from the beach cafe above Maidencombe cove and the arrows indicate the cause for concern. A minor land slip has already taken place and the Environment Agency had a look Christmas eve in case the cove had to be closed.

ARCHIVE: Entrance to Crossways at Maidencombe Cross

ARCHIVE: Entrance to Crossways at Maidencombe Cross
After a catalogue of antisocial behaviour displayed by motorists illegally entering a private area, the police recommended that the entrance be made narrower. A sad indictment of society.

THE FOLLY AT SLADNOR PARK

THE FOLLY AT SLADNOR PARK
Constructed between 1830-1833 by Mrs Groves who inhabited Sladnor Manor House at the time. The hexagonal tower and accompanying arched outbuilding were built of Devon red sandstone. A projecting castellated cornice crowned the gothic apertures and single faux crossbow slit at ground level. A most interesting aspect of the folly is the purpose-built pony and trap winding carriage-way which Mrs Groves carved through the north western woods of the estate to facilitate her passage to and from the folly. The structure is now in poor condition and it is earnestly hoped that Richmond Villages, the new owners of Sladnor, will be able to make safe the folly to enable residents to enjoy in years to come.

FEATURES OF MAIDENCOMBE

Some of the features we will be mentioning:

ROCK HOUSE GAZEBO
THE CASCADE
THE IRON STILE
THE CASTELLATED FOLLY
THE BAT RETREAT
THE PUMP HOUSE
THE PILL BOX
THE 190 OAK
SMUGGLER'S LANE

GRADE 2 LISTED ROCK HOUSE GAZEBO

GRADE 2 LISTED ROCK HOUSE GAZEBO
Circa 1850. Constructed of Devon red sandstone with unfortunately, as is the case with the Sladnor Folly, some cement patching. Sited at the eastern end of the garden, overlooking the sea. A single storey structure with faux castellated parapet. It has a one-window front incorporating a gabled porch on the front to left with a segmental headed and arched doorway. There is a matching arched window to the right. Reportedly, the structure had a flight of external steps for access to the flat roof with commanding views of Lyme Bay. The interior is clay-tiled laid.