MAIDENCOMBE.NET AUTHOR Jim Campbell

MAIDENCOMBE.NET AUTHOR Jim Campbell
Maidencombe resident since 1960. Local historian and author of the 'Coves of Maidencombe'.
Copyright © 2013 . All Rights Reserved.

COMBE WEATHER

TIDES

CURRENT MOON

KESTREL CALLING

BUZZARD IN MY GARDEN

The bowl of the coombe as seen from Sladnor heights

The bowl of the coombe as seen from Sladnor heights

Maidencombe point

Maidencombe point
as seen above Maidencombe cove.

Blog Archive

Tuesday, December 31, 2013

A HAPPY & HEALTHY NEW YEAR TO ALL READERS

Jim Campbell - site author and resident of 54 years
A new year - a new hope.  Some thirty minutes off midnight and I'd like to take this opportunity to wish a happy and healthy new year to all readers of this little website on Maidencombe, a little village on the northern boundary of Torbay.

Plagued with ill health the past month, tonight is no different to other nights as I will be staying in and welcoming the New Year in with my Mum, So Cruise and cat and kittens.

Fifteen or so minutes later, So Cruise, my collie cross and I will then venture out on our Night Patrol (whatever my health or weather, I manage this virtually every night of the year) around the combe, tending to various animals that rely on me for food - Becbla, the blind vixen, the now totally blind old badger boar and some ailing animals.

Sunday, December 29, 2013

FIELDS OF MAIDENCOMBE MAPS COMPLETE

It is with a degree of relief that I can report that the Fields of Maidencombe maps (North and South) are now complete.  A text description of most of the fields and their name origins is underway and should be finished in the next few days.
As can be seen from a specimen copy (above) - names omitted - of the redrawn map of Maidencombe,  many changes have been administered to ensure that there are no copyright infringements of existing OS maps.
The finished maps will be submitted to Torbay Council, the TCCT and St Marychurch  Ward Partnership to be placed on record.
Without the assistance of Alan and Bob Hunt,  historical knowledge of Maidencombe would be lost.

Thursday, December 26, 2013

ROAR OF THE CRUISEDOG

video
Rom, one of the 'fox' kittens (see ROM & REMY THE FOX KITTENS - A VERY STRANGE STORY ) gets a bit too close for So Cruise's liking on Christmas Day and the warning is dramatic.  It all took only three seconds so I've slowed it down eight times for the effect to be appreciated.   So Cruise is actually extremely tolerant of the kittens and even shares his lower bunk bed with them.

Wednesday, December 25, 2013

CHRISTMAS DAY SWIM FROM MAIDENCOMBE COVE

video
Taken from the northern plateau, some 150 metres away.  Excuse bloom on video, camera malfunction.

HAIL CHRISTMAS DAY

Just about to set out on our Christmas Day Night Patrol and there was a drumming sound on the bin outside the kitchen window.  Venturing outside,  I was welcomed by a hefty hail shower which swiftly covered the path in a Christmas card white embrace.  Five minutes later and it had vanished as quickly as it had come with the temperature over 40 Fahrenheit.  Still, the first real sign of winter has manifested itself in Maidencombe.

The Sanko Mineral, as I thought, has been undergoing maintenance on its 'cruise' around Lyme Bay and has now returned to Babbacombe Bay, lying some 10 kms offshore.

A very happy and hopefully,  healthy Christmas to everyone.

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

COMBE ESCAPES THE WORST

Just back from our Night Patrol  and the wind and rain which has lashed the combe all day and most of the evening has subsided - for the time being, as more of the same is rushing in from the west.
Two dead trees down, a small one at the top of Steep Hill and another in the identical spot of a few days ago - caught against the overhead telephone line round the corner from Beehive bend.
Flood water is cascading down Honeysett  and Orchard lanes.  The lower reaches of Steep Hill are awash and culverts are blocked.
However, the combe has escaped the worst ravages of the gale and we should be grateful for that.
The Sanko Mineral has been cruising around Lyme Bay all day and evening, covering about 100 kms on its voyage to nowhere.  She is currently some 20 kms off Berry Head and making 2.8 knots.
There are currently nine vessels sheltering in Babbacombe Bay.

Monday, December 23, 2013

STRANGE TRACK OF THE SANKO MINERAL

After being moored in Babbacombe Bay for many weeks and becoming a familiar sight off Maidencombe, the Japanese flagged cargo vessel Sanko Mineral (photo above) weighed anchor and departed at just after 8 am today.

She then proceeded slowly (about 2 knots) south for 25 miles before veering due north and picking up speed (11 knots +).  A few minutes ago she has turned due south again and reduced speed.

Perhaps she is recharging batteries or undergoing routine maintenance after such a prolonged period at anchor.

Quite a few vessels are currently sheltering nearby including two cargo vessels, the Taranto (ARG) and Sormovskiy-3056 (RUS) which are moored 2 kms off to the south of Maidencombe.

Sunday, December 22, 2013

DREAD WEATHER WARNING FOR MONDAY

Good luck if you're venturing out tomorrow as torrential rain and winds in excess of 60 mph are forecast.  The unusual weather patterns continue with unseasonably  warm temperatures. For the second year running, Spock, our tortoise is still up and looking forward to a Christmas cabbage leaf.
The combe remains waterlogged from previous rainfall and there's a high risk of flooding.

Thursday, December 19, 2013

MAIDENCOMBE TAKES A BATTERING

The much vaunted Storm Christian of October 27th bore little comparison to what was visited upon the combe on Wednesday.  Strong winds lifted my extension in the afternoon and combined with heavy rain, Maidencombe took quite a battering.

A few trees have succumbed to the stronger gusts. Residents of Steep Hill might like to observe a dead tree which has lodged against the overhead telephone cable just after the Beehive bend.

News round-up in Maidencombe:

Stock fencing continues in Nickels Reach and The Slopes.  Temporary roadworks are in place at the junction of Brim Hill and Rockhouse Lane where repairs to the street lamp are in progress.  The fault is exactly the same as when the light standard outside my property failed, so other light standards can be expected to domino effect with the same affliction.  Engineers are hopeful the light will be restored by Christmas.

Monday, December 16, 2013

HOPE TO RESUME POSTING

Apologies for lack of posts.  Illness has been the reason.  I hope to resume posting later today.

Saturday, December 14, 2013

FEROX IN DRAMATIC DASH FOR SPANISH COAST

Early hours of Friday 13th (unlucky for some) saw the Ferox operation dramatically veer from its projected track south and turn towards the Spanish coast.  The tug had been battling winds in excess of 30 knots and mounting wave heights and it seems that the captain had deemed that safety was the order of the day.
The tug and accompanying inland tanker (not known if it is under tow or under its own power) came close in to Muros, a Galician coastal town but did not moor to shelter.
Prescribing a circle, the tug immediately headed out of the bay of Muros and has resumed her original course southwards.
The manoeuvre is strange.  Weather conditions could have improved for the better as soon as the Ferox made safe waters, or a crew member has needed medical attention necessitating the detour.
The Ferox is currently (01:32 Dec 14th) 20 miles west of Sanxexo making 4.3 knots on a heading of 207 degrees.
It is now reported from Poole that the other inland tanker (presumably the Rix Harrier) has left the harbour.  Mysterious ..

Tuesday, December 10, 2013

FEROX UPDATE - CORRECTED

My apologies for posting the wrong tows for the Ferox, here's the corrected information.

The Vanuatu flagged tug Ferox has been released from her detention in Poole Harbour (detained October 27) and was seen clearing Brownsea Island late Thursday afternoon, December 5th.  She was making over 8 knots as she entered the English Channel westbound, apparently too fast to be towing the Valetta.
The Ferox was seen south of Salcombe the next day and then disappeared with the AIS not showing.
She's now back on AIS and is presently some 60 kms west of  Cape Finisterre, making 3.3 knots on a heading of 208 degrees.
An observer in Poole reports that one of the inland tankers is still there and it may be the case that the Ferox is on station with the Rix Harrier which is able to operate under its own power.
There are reportedly two captains on the Ferox at this time.
No destination is given and the original destination of Lagos, Nigeria might not apply at this time.
Given that all tows are currently under intense scrutiny by the Nigerian government in their quest to stamp out oil theft from their pipelines, the Ferox and accompanying vessel may be rerouted to another African country - perhaps Dakar, Senegal - the drop-off port for the More convoy of the towed Novara and the Bominflot 5.
Many thanks to the Grim Snapper for alerting me to the 'Channel Dash' of the Ferox from Poole.

Monday, December 09, 2013

HMS SEVERN CLOSE TO SHORE

Viewed from Brim Hill, the warship is apparently very close in but is actually lying about a kilometre offshore.  The Ore Stone rock can be seen to the right.

Sunday, December 08, 2013

HMS SEVERN IN BABBACOMBE BAY

video
Zoom in close from the top of Brim Hill this afternoon to make out the identification number P282 and confirm the return of HMS Severn to Babbacombe Bay.  Special op, training exercise or jolly ashore?  Strangely, the AIS was turned off when she moored yesterday suggesting it may have been a special op.

Sunday, December 01, 2013

CONTENTED

Reposing on a colour coordinated stool, Rom (left) and Remy, the rescued 'fox' kittens.

FLASHBACK TO DECEMBER 2010

video
The snow covered fields at Maidencombe December 19th 2010 and with warnings of a harsh winter to come, this could be a vision of what is to come for us soon.

BURNING OF THE BAMBOO MAN JUNE 5 2016

SLADNOR PARK CHALETS

SLADNOR PARK CHALETS
Eerily shrouded in mist, two of the lower chalets of Sladnor Park.

AN ODE TO SLADNOR PARK

(sung to the tune of 'Home on the Range')

Oh give me a park where the badgers can roam
Where the deer and the wildlife reside
There never is heard the developer's word
To disturb where the denizens abide

Oh give me a park where the diggers are banned
And the architect can't earn his fee
Where the noise of the town
Is a far distant sound
And conservation is all it can be

For when houses are built
The council covered in guilt
And all the animals forlorn
Now the only sounds to be heard
Are vehicles absurd
And the cries of a motherless fawn

Jim Campbell

BLOG CONTENT

BLOG CONTENT
The twinning of Maidencombe with Comeinbemad reflects the light-hearted nature of this gentle blog. The articles posted are written by the author alone and have no connection with any official body or association.

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OUR MAIN LINK - CLICK ON IMAGE TO REDIRECT

OUR MAIN LINK - CLICK ON IMAGE TO REDIRECT
THE ENDANGERED CIRL BUNTING - SYMBOL OF THE MAIDENCOMBE COMMUNITY GROUP

PUTTING MAIDENCOMBE ON THE MAP

PUTTING MAIDENCOMBE ON THE MAP

OUR LOCAL LINK

I came across this fascinating and informative guide to St Marychurch and Babbacombe recently. For many Maidencombers, these are our local shops and first 'port of call' before venturing into the urban jungles of Torquay. There's a local news feed which is regularly updated. Well worth a look. Here's the link:



CLICK HERE FOR BABBACOMBE & ST MARYCHURCH GUIDE WEBSITE

MOST VIEWED POST ON THIS SITE

MOST VIEWED POST ON THIS SITE
The old Toll House on the west side of the A379 Teignmouth Road, stands at the junction of Claddon Lane with the A379 about 50 yards from Ridge Road and the former position of the black and white Solomons Post sign (see side panel right). This early photo shows the open porch (lower left) - now blocked off and the blanked out toll-board recess (top right). Under the angled roof on the right, there is a small shop and working post office. The building probably dates from 1827 when the new road was built. Originally named Solomon's Post Gate when there was a gate across the road for the toll collector to open upon payment.

RAMBLING GROUP WRITE-UP OF WATCOMBE TO MAIDENCOMBE WALK

Found this interesting little site with a rambling group's write up of walks. CLICK HERE FOR MAIDENCOMBE WALK ARTICLE

MAIDENCOMBER SLADNOR VIDEO AND WRITE-UP

YOUR LOCAL WEB APPROVES DREAMINCOMBES

YOUR LOCAL WEB APPROVES DREAMINCOMBES
After scrutiny by a panel, this site has been added as a reputable source of information about Maidencombe.

ARCHIVE: MAIDENCOMBE TIMELINE EVENING AT THE THATCHED TAVERN

The first Timeline evening took place Wednesday evening March 20th at the Thatched Tavern. Local lad Ziggy Austin's brainchild, it was an endeavour to map out the history of Maidencombe on a ten metre paper scroll. The initiative was first mooted and widely supported on Ziggy's Maidencombe Residents Facebook page. Residents and non residents were asked if they could research local history on the area and bring along any material such as postcards or text to place on the scroll.
The first evening was well attended and as can be seen in the photos on the left, a great deal was achieved.
Longest residing villager, Alan Hunt attended to add his considerable knowledge and was supported by his 'young' student Jim Campbell with a mere 53 years of residence under his belt.
The pub opened up the restaurant area for the occasion and were most generous in providing sandwiches for the studious throng.


SOLOMONS POST AT THE JUNCTION OF TEIGNMOUTH ROAD & RIDGE ROAD

SOLOMONS POST AT THE JUNCTION OF TEIGNMOUTH ROAD & RIDGE ROAD
No known images of this iconic Maidencombe landmark. Post war and up to the late 1960's, sign posts were wooden posts painted black and white. This is a close reconstruction of the sign where buses would actually pull in to for passengers to alight or board.

A UNIQUE VIDEO

A video of one of my foxes being treated for Sarcoptic mange - taking the medication on the food by hand. She recovered completely and my thanks go out to the Derbyshire Fox Rescue who supplied the medication.

DRAMATIC EROSION OF THE SOUTHWEST COASTAL FOOTPATH

Worth a look as Maidencombe's section of the SWCP is also very much under threat.

From myfoxesandbadgers site

ARCHIVE: DANGEROUS STATE OF CLIFF FACE

ARCHIVE: DANGEROUS STATE OF CLIFF FACE
Photo taken from the beach cafe above Maidencombe cove and the arrows indicate the cause for concern. A minor land slip has already taken place and the Environment Agency had a look Christmas eve in case the cove had to be closed.

ARCHIVE: Entrance to Crossways at Maidencombe Cross

ARCHIVE: Entrance to Crossways at Maidencombe Cross
After a catalogue of antisocial behaviour displayed by motorists illegally entering a private area, the police recommended that the entrance be made narrower. A sad indictment of society.

THE FOLLY AT SLADNOR PARK

THE FOLLY AT SLADNOR PARK
Constructed between 1830-1833 by Mrs Groves who inhabited Sladnor Manor House at the time. The hexagonal tower and accompanying arched outbuilding were built of Devon red sandstone. A projecting castellated cornice crowned the gothic apertures and single faux crossbow slit at ground level. A most interesting aspect of the folly is the purpose-built pony and trap winding carriage-way which Mrs Groves carved through the north western woods of the estate to facilitate her passage to and from the folly. The structure is now in poor condition and it is earnestly hoped that Richmond Villages, the new owners of Sladnor, will be able to make safe the folly to enable residents to enjoy in years to come.

FEATURES OF MAIDENCOMBE

Some of the features we will be mentioning:

ROCK HOUSE GAZEBO
THE CASCADE
THE IRON STILE
THE CASTELLATED FOLLY
THE BAT RETREAT
THE PUMP HOUSE
THE PILL BOX
THE 190 OAK
SMUGGLER'S LANE

GRADE 2 LISTED ROCK HOUSE GAZEBO

GRADE 2 LISTED ROCK HOUSE GAZEBO
Circa 1850. Constructed of Devon red sandstone with unfortunately, as is the case with the Sladnor Folly, some cement patching. Sited at the eastern end of the garden, overlooking the sea. A single storey structure with faux castellated parapet. It has a one-window front incorporating a gabled porch on the front to left with a segmental headed and arched doorway. There is a matching arched window to the right. Reportedly, the structure had a flight of external steps for access to the flat roof with commanding views of Lyme Bay. The interior is clay-tiled laid.